Undergraduate Economics Journals: Learning By Doing

Main Article Content

Robert M. Leekley
Stephanie Davis-Kahl
Michael C. Seeborg

Keywords

Undergraduate Research, Undergraduate Journals, Active Learning, Assessment

Abstract

Although there are currently only a few undergraduate journals in economics, we expect their numbers to increase substantially in the future because of several developments: 1) research and writing activity is increasing in economics programs, 2) online publication is now more feasible and cost efficient than ever, and 3) students are increasingly aware of their on-line identity and desire to project a positive and professional image. Since increasing use of undergraduate journals might benefit a number of students, including potential article authors, article reviewers, and editors, there is a need to begin to assess the educational benefits of participation in journals. This paper reports results from a survey of reviewers who had reviewed articles for two undergraduate journals, The Park Place Economist and The Undergraduate Economic Review. The reviewers generally agreed that they received a range of benefits from the review process and nearly all agreed that reviewing had been a valuable use of their time. Several of the suggested benefits were positively correlated with measures of participation intensity. Nearly half the respondents thought the benefits would have been greater with more, not fewer, articles to review.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Abstract 118 | PDF Downloads 108